Most e-book readers use cell phones and computers

nookwinners2If you had to guess, you’d probably say most people who read e-books are doing so on a Kindle or Nook, right?

Apparently not. A new Pew survey shows that among e-book readers under 30-years-old, 55 percent are more likely to use a computer, and 41 percent would use a cell phone — compare that to the 23 percent who would use an e-book reader and the 16 percent who prefer a tablet.

nookwinners5But considering how many people own smartphones these days, maybe that shouldn’t be such a shock. I can’t help but feel surprised, though, especially when I learned that most e-book readers are between the ages of 30-39. If e-books are contributing to the rise of reading in America, you might expect the highest group of e-readers to be teens or twentysomethings. The survey recorded that 47 percent of young people read long-form digital content including books, magazines, and newspapers.

Still, the 18-24 age group has the most readers overall (of print, e-format, and audiobooks) at 88 percent, followed by 86 percent in the 16-17 range. The 30-39 group came in at 84 percent. People over 65-years-of-age accounted for the fewest readers at 68 percent.

I guess e-book devices are a gadget that just hasn’t caught on to much younger readers. Why is that, do you think? Come to think of it, I’m not sure I’ve seen an ad that markets e-readers to teens, who are always using cell phones — have you?

The study also confirmed that most younger readers don’t know libraries offer e-books even though it’s a desirable option to them. That drives forward the importance of stronger e-book support and advertising at libraries and in communities, including schools.

Photo credit: Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

2 thoughts on “Most e-book readers use cell phones and computers

  1. Sarah

    I’m surprised too! I would have thought the younger group would be the powerhouse behind the e-readers. But you’re right, I’ve never seen an ad directed at them either. Interesting!

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