Marvel puts superheroines into ‘traditional women’s’ roles with a touch of rouge and green lipstick

Rogue TouchRogue and She-Hulk fight hard to beat the bad guys and restore justice to the world, all while struggling for equal rights in the workplace. But now Marvel and Hyperion Books are shuffling them off to romance novels. They’re a real girl’s supergirls, but here, their fists and intelligence are better served for putting on makeup and picking out purses — that’s how we can teach young girls about empowerment, apparently.

The problem is, young girls are going read these books and identity “superheroine” with romantic success.

Now, maybe the writers on this new line of romance novels (Christine Woodward and Marta Acosta) won’t have the characters swooning like helpless damsels before men — because there are plenty of “hip” Marvel comics that deal with teenage relationships and gender roles that don’t turn the characters into complete brainless airheads — but I can easily see these turning out just awfully. In comic books, at least, the gigantic muscles and dramatic facial expressions tell you that these are powerful women, not to be messed with. They could toss a human man over the moon if they wanted to, for goodness sake.

I can’t help but feel like the focus on writing alone — and not any accompanying visuals — will translate these strong female characters into silly little girls. Can we trust these novels to “showcase strong, smart heroines seeking happiness and love while battling cosmic evil”?

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