Tomb Raider: Savagery, legacy, and survival

Tomb Raider

On the island of Yamatai, everything can be conquered with fire. Really unrealistic fire.

March’s reboot of the long-running Tomb Raider video game series takes Lara Croft back to the beginning — to her first real adventure. She’s young and pampered, but she loves archeology. She convinces the team aboard the Endurance to brave the Dragon’s Triangle, where she believes the hidden island of Yamatai is located. Then their ship crashes in a curiously violent storm and, well, welcome to the jungle.

The whole point of the game is to show how Lara transforms from naive girl to hardened survivor. She takes the life of a man to save her own, hunts wild animals for food, and fends off wolves. She overcomes her fears and kicks a lot of ass.

Tomb Raider is also a game in love with fire. Lara lights torches, huddles around campfires, burns salvage and blockades, shoots flaming arrows, explodes oil barrels, and so on. It’s a foolproof solution to almost every problem and scenario, and it burns neatly, igniting only what it’s supposed to before putting itself out.

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A little T&R!

Midnight update!

Whoa, it’s been busy around here. I’ll have another fancy book cover for you tomorrow, and another comic book pick soon. But I wanted to take a second and share a piece I’ve been working on for what feels like ages. It took awhile to put this editorial together because of the interviews, but two wonderful volunteers stepped up and helped put a lock on this thing when no one else could (or would).

Maybe you’ve heard of Tomb Raider—the video games, the movies, the comics, etc. Or maybe you’ve always favored Indiana Jones and want to know more about his legacy and the characters he’s inspired. Then again, you could have a burning crush on Nathan Drake of Uncharted. Whatever your preference, kindly take a moment to read my first submission for GamesBeat, the gaming division of VentureBeat. You might just learn something about your favorite characters.

And thanks so much to Hal Barwood and Stellalune (who mentioned me on her site’s blog, Twitter, Facebook, and elsewhere) for lending their voices to the article. It wouldn’t have been half as good to read without their input.

I hope you enjoy, and let me know what you think!